Science Department

 Ms. Veronica Masila

Ms. Veronica Masila

The science department is headed by Ms. Veronica Masila. She is a teacher of Mathematics and Business Studies.

The department is comprised of five subjects: Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Computer Studies.

The department also has the following teachers:

  • Veronica Masila (H.O.D)
  • Felix Mogoa – Mathematics
  • Henry Waweru – Mathematics and Chemistry
  • Barack  Dola – Biology and Chemistry
  • Daniel  Asenje – Biology and Chemistry
  • Sr. Rose Lufutu – Mathematics
  • Edwin Omollo – Physics and Mathematics
  • Vincent  Mwashumbe – Computer studies and Biology

The science teachers are very co-operative, foster good teamwork, and are committed to their duties. They also go beyond the classroom when teaching to ensure that the students are encouraged and understand the subjects, helping to change the mentality that the science subjects are hard. Thank you and God bless you.

Many students in the past were scared of sciences, especially girls. Subjects like Physics and Chemistry were mainly left for boys, who often recorded higher marks than girls. Many girls preferred Biology, most likely because it involves few calculations. Now, the number is almost balancing as more girls have begun to take Physics and Chemistry both in junior and senior classes.

Students in the past never took part in science projects and national science congresses. In the year 2011, a good number of students took part in the science congress and reached the provincial level, ranking fourth. In the 2012 academic year a larger number showed up, and the results are very much improving.

This year the expectations are quite higher on our students after it has been proven that many of them are undertaking science courses like medicine and engineering courses in the universities and colleges. We encourage our students to see sciences as fun to deal with and this has brought forth some good fruits, as most of them, especially girls, are taking up subjects like Physics which have traditionally been dominated by boys.